Re: Deice

Date:         27 Mar 2001 16:05:20 
From:         glpilotsrv@aol.com (GLPILOTSRV)
Organization: AOL http://www.aol.com
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David Pinella <david.pinella@sdrc.com> wrote in message
news:airliners.2001.6@ditka.Chicago.COM...
> I was on a Canadair RJ yesterday. I think this is the first time that I
> have been on a plane that was deiced. I have a question. How much does
> deicing cost for a plane like this? A 747? How many gallons? Is it
> recycled? It looked like they used a pink spray and then a green spray.
> I assume the red is a deice and the green is an anti ice, like ethelyne
> glycol. It stuck really nice to the wing, very pretty. What was the red?

There are several types of de-ice and anti-icing fluids. What you saw was Type
1 fluid being applied, followed by an application of Type 4 fluid.

Type 1 is the reddish orange fluid  It is a very thin fluid that is heated and
applied to de-ice the aircraft.

To prevent ice from reforming, Type 4 fluid is applied. Type 4 is the emerald
green fluid that is not heated. Type 4 is a thicker fluid and can be used on
aircraft that have a rotate speed greater that 80 to 100 knots. Aircraft with
slower rotate speeds would not generate the necessary energy to shear and
eliminate the fluid from the aircraft prior to take-off.

The cost of de-icing an aircraft varies greatly. The variances include the cost
of the fluid, the weather conditions, and the pilot's request (wings and stab
only or entire aircraft).

I have been charged as little as $250.00 US dollars in Kansas to a whopping
$10,000 CA dollars in Montreal.

G. Lee