Re: Quality Control of Delivered Airliners

Date:         30 Mar 99 01:53:18 
From:         "Mike Kotas" <mikeymike@seanet.com>
References:   1 2
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Katie Schwarz wrote in message ...
>When I took the tour at the Everett plant, they said that there are
>three stages of testing: by Boeing, by the airline, and by the FAA.  I
>think the flight testing is done mostly at Boeing Field near Seattle
>rather than at Everett; is that right?

Well, that is true for the single-aisle planes. Many of the flight tests are
conducted at both Renton Field and Seattle field, although lately I have
seen a few of the narrow bodies up at Everett (Payne field) probably on a
few hours hiatus. Specifically I have seen Southwest and Aeroflot 737's up
at the Everett Flight Line (Whats an interesting aside, is that Aeroflot
takes delivery of there planes out of Everett...not sure why, because at the
time, ARO's 777's were already delivered)

Anyways, back to the main point of discussion....having been on a few 777
flight tests, they have always performed touch and go's out at Moses Lakes,
but I have never known the actual flight tests to be based at Moses Lakes.
They really can't take the plane from the Everett Flight line for a few days
and place it over there. Too much work would be missed by doing that.

I do know that JAL does all there pilot training over at Moses Lake. I saw 2
747's and a MD-11 over there a few weeks ago when I was on a AAL 777 flight
test.

>>  Also if flight testing is
>>done to green airplanes how can they simulate center of gravity issues
>>without a full pax load/or cargo.

Boeing supplies to the customer a Weights and Balances manual. Now I agree
that flight testing really can't be performed without the plane being
painted, but I have seen flight tests to greenplanes, probably to perform
checklists to other parts of the plane including functionality of the
systems.

You can get away with out a full pax load or cargo via weight analysis and
ground tests, but I am not exactly sure on this.

Thanks,
        Mike Kotas
Passenger Seat Engineer