Re: BA B777 Engine Blows

Date:         30 Mar 98 04:31:05 
From:         Pete Mellor <pm@csr.city.ac.uk>
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P.Dubbin@physiology.unimelb.edu.au (Philip Dubbin) asked on
Mon Mar 30 09:53:19 1998 :-
> In article <airliners.1998.478@ohare.Chicago.COM>,
> arsenal@caribbean.prestel.co.uk (Roger Chung-Wee) wrote:
>> First there was a year-long delay in the plane entering service caused
>> by the GE90's failure to pass a standard test for withstanding flying
>> into a flock of birds.
>
> what, if i may ask, does this test involve?????

I recall having seen a television programme in which a slow-motion
shot was shown of a dead chicken (well, I assume it was dead, and
it certainly was after the test! :-) being sucked into the inlet
of a turbofan.

(I presume the frozen chicken is used for certification for
trans-polar routes! :-)

BAe in Stevenage, UK, accidentally carried out a more stringent test
when an unfortunate engineer on the ground was sucked in by the
inlet draught of an engine being bench tested. The details were
rather gruesome. Apparently, his white coat spread out and acted
as an aerofoil, keeping him suspended in front of the engine for
several seconds before he accelerated towards the fan. Urgh!

The accident occurred several years ago. I can't recall the exact
date, but I remember reading the report in one of the Stevenage
local newspapers.

Peter Mellor, Centre for Software Reliability, City University, Northampton
Square, London EC1V 0HB, UK. Tel: +44 (171) 477-8422, Fax: +44 (171) 477-8585
E-mail: p.mellor@csr.city.ac.uk, Web: http://www@csr.city.ac.uk/
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