Re: Runway Lengths

Date:         19 Feb 98 01:34:13 
From:         jcastleANTISPAM@eden.com (Joe Castleman)
Organization: Gyrofrog Communications
References:   1
Next article
View raw article
  or MIME structure

In article <airliners.1998.297@ohare.Chicago.COM>, wales011@concentric.net wrote:
>Could someone mail me the length of runway needed to land for today's
>airliners?  I live in a city with an airport of 7,500 feet and wondered
>what exactly could land there.  I'd love to see a DC-10 fly in.

Your airport could accomodate a DC-10.  I live in Austin TX, where the
runway is about the same length.  AA used to fly in one or two DC-10s a
day, but not for 2 or 3 years, and the biggest plane I've seen there
lately is a B757 (although about a year ago, I saw an AA MD-11 fly in --
wonder what the story was behind that?).  I used to see Stretch DC-8
Freighters, but last summer they moved the air freight operations to
Bergstrom (which will be our new airport next year).

Keep in mind that the DC-10 was, in part, designed to be able to fly in
and out of New York LGA, where each runway is 7000 feet.

I thought 7000 feet was short, but Orange Co. is under 6000 (barely over a
mile!) and handles B757s, as well as transcontinental flights (a lot of
fuel to lift off of a little runway).  Burbank, Chicago-Midway, and
Washington-Nat'l are all under 7000 feet, I believe.  St. Thomas is now
7000 feet, *after* being stretched in the 1970s (following a crash landing
by a DC-8).

I've wondered about this subject for a while -- I'd like to know where the
smallest runway is that is in regular use by airliners (i.e. B737 or
larger).  So far SNA seems to take the cake...

--
Joe Castleman   (to reply, remove "ANTISPAM" from my address)
Gyrofrog Communications   http://www.eden.com/~jcastle
Austin, Texas  U.S.A.
"I was always frightened of strange people" --Andy Warhol