Re: A 777 with four engines.

Date:         29 Jul 98 00:29:30 
From:         westin*nospam@graphics.cornell.edu (Stephen H. Westin)
Organization: Program of Computer Graphics -- Cornell University
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k_ish <kenish@ix.netcom.com> writes:
> Coincidentally read a transcript of a lecture by Captain Haynes to
> engineers at NASA Dryden.

<snip>

> The reason he was at Dryden was to test fly a simulator where instead of
> the control yoke controlling the usual surfaces, there was a reversion
> mode that used thrust for control of yaw and pitch.  The simulator was
> a F-15, which has both engines almost on the centerline.  The distance
> from the centerline isn't a big factor if you have lots of thrust!

And, in fact, a fighter plan has been successfully landed at
Edwards/Dryden with no use of control surfaces. Even better, the same
feat was achieved, several times, with an MD-11! It required some
clever reprogramming of the fly-by-wire system to translate control
inputs to engine thrust commands, but worked quite nicely, I
understand. Manufacturers and airlines don't seem to be interested
though.

--
-Stephen H. Westin
Any information or opinions in this message are mine: they do not
represent the position of Cornell University or any of its sponsors.