Re: Gimli 767 nose gear

Date:         30 Mar 97 03:54:28 
From:         Tim Long <tlong@vcnet.com>
Organization: Internet Access of Ventura County 805.383.3500
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Merlin Dorfman wrote:
>
> Larry Stone (lstone@interserve.com) wrote:
>
> : Amazing how little damage can occur with a skiilful landing. In 1990, UA
> : had a 747-400 (almost brand new) make a partial gear up landing at LAX -
> : only the wing  (outer) main gear came down, the nose and body (inner)
> : mains stayed up. I saw a video of it - the captain held the nose off until
> : about 10 knots, finally lowering it oh so slowly. Damage was limited to
> : the nose gear doors (which did open) and some skin panels. The plane was
> : back in service 5 days later.
>
>      I need a little clarification here.  First, how much lift can the
> wings produce at 10 knots?  Not enough, I suspect, to keep the plane
> from tipping over while perched on one landing gear--unless there was
> quite a headwind.  Second, I don't have a model in front of me, but I
> suspect that when the plane finally did tip over it came to rest on
> the one landing gear, an engine nacelle, and part of the nose.  While I
> can believe that there might have been only some skin panel damage on
> the nose, there must have been some damage to the engine...maybe it
> was possible simply to replace the nacelle and engine within five days.

Merlin - you missed a key point here. The 747 has *dual main gear*. The
post states that the outer main gear came down (that means *two* sets of
gear - the outer ones on *both* wings). Hence, two main gear and no
nosewheel ==> no nacelle contact (as long as the main gear don't
buckle!).

Tim Long