Re: 2nd Officer on a 767

Date:         01 Oct 97 19:57:49 
From:         don@news.daedalus.co.nz (Don Stokes)
Organization: Daedalus Consulting
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In article <airliners.1997.2354@ohare.Chicago.COM>,
Karl Swartz <kls@ohare.Chicago.COM> wrote:
>On some early 737 operations there was also an FE, riding jumpseat
>since there is no FE panel or other provision for a third working
>body.  The nominal reason for this was that the union felt a third
>set of eyes was necessary for safety reasons.  After a time, all
>involved agreed this was a waste and the FEs were probably so bored
>they would have been too dazed to contribute much anyway.  They came
>up with contract terms which maintained the number of pilots, but
>found something useful for them to do.

It gets worse -- when the DC-9 went into production, it was two-pilot;
when the 737 was built to compete with it, ALPA decided that there should
be a flight engineer, even though there wasn't anything much for the FE to
do, and despite the fact the aircraft hauled about the same number of pax.

The result was that the 737 sold rather badly in the US, although it sold
pretty well outside the US where the pilots unions were a bit more pragmatic.

(The other reason the DC-9 outsold the 737 was because Douglas badly
underpriced the aircraft, which pretty much led to the failure of the
company and subsequent takeover by McDonnell.)

--
Don Stokes, Network Consultant, Daedalus Consulting Services  +64 25 739 724
Network Design, Cable Plans, LANs, WANs, Radio Networks, Internet Consulting