Re: Air Accident Investigation

Date:         01 Jan 97 20:59:23 
From:         arch6@inlink.com (Arch McKinlay, VI)
Organization: McKinlay & Associates
References:   1
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In article <airliners.1996.3117@ohare.Chicago.COM>, davemclark@aol.com
(Davemclark) wrote:

> Can anyone mail me who is involved in accident investigation of any type,
> civil or military, UK or US and in any role, ops or engineering.  I am a
> student of Aeronautical Engineering and would like to get into this field
> but at the moment am just looking towards studying some aspect of it for a
> final year project.

I have been involved in several aerospace companies, the FAA's background
work aand in software safety and system safety and teach software safety
at University of Southern California (USC).

IMHO, the people who qualify fro company or NTSB positions to investigate
accidents are primarily pilots or ex-pilots, aerospace company experienced
for a minimum of ten years, and heavily screened for problem-solving and
attention-to-detail skills.

If you intend to get into accident investigation sooner than the time it
takes to get these qualifications, then you'd better join the military.
In the military, a good engineering-minded pilot on second tour
(approximately nine to twelve years of service) can be chosen to attend
safety officers school and accident investigation classes.

Through USC, we offer classes in aircraft and helicopter safety, accident
investigation etc. that is at the Master's Degree level. The USAF has a
similar program through University of Washington (UW), Seattle, WA. There
are also fire and other investigative techniques taught through smaller
universities and independent groups.

I recently worked with an individual regarding qualifications for NTSB
membership and his one strike against himself was non-pilot status.

If you care for more information, email me. Happy New Year!

cheers, arch