Re: HS Trident

Date:         16 Jun 97 21:35:38 
From:         amuir@twsu.campus.mci.net (Andrew Muir)
Organization: Nobody but me
References:   1
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In article <airliners.1997.1244@ohare.Chicago.COM>,
   tombros@ifi.unizh.ch (Dimitrios Tombros) wrote:
>Are there any HS Tridents still flying (airliner or military)? Why did
>this aircraft which was so similar to B727 have so little success? Was
>it some kind of construction or operational problem or just bad
>marketing?

Listening too much to one customer may have had something to do with it.  BEA
had alot of design input in the aircraft specifying a plane to carry about 100
passengers over relatively short distances.  This resulted in the RR Spey
engine being used, and the aircraft loosing alot of growth potential.  So
while DH had a 100 seater with 3 engines (Trident 1), Boeing came in with the
727-100 at up to  130 seats and bigger engines.  The 727 grew into the -200
(up to 189 seats) while the Trident went through the 1E (upto 140 seats), 2E
(149 seats) and the 4 engined Trident 3 (up to 180 seats).   The fourth engine
was a Take-off boost engine to compensate for the lack of trust from the
Speys.  Now that's effecient, carrying around an engine that is only used on
Take-off.

Marketing was also told not to market the plane overseas until BEA's
specification was completly nailed down.  So while BEA may have been happy
with the plane, not too many other airlines had BEA's particular requirements
in mind.

Andy Muir