Re: UAL 747?

From:         kls@ohare.Chicago.COM (Karl Swartz)
Organization: Chicago Software Works, Menlo Park, California
Date:         10 Jun 96 12:22:17 
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>Last year I flew from Montreal to Vancouver on a Air Canada B-767.  For some
>reason, I was discussing B-767's with the Flight Attendant, and with a
>twinkle in his eye, he said "guess which 767 this is?".

Don't believe them.  Any (in)famous plane(s) in an airline's fleet
quickly seem to become the whole fleet.  A story in Airliners a few
years ago detailed the search by a 727 pilot who encounterd dozens
of ex-Northwest 727s that were *all* reputedly the very plane that
D.B. Cooper jumped out of.  None of them were the real McCoy, until
he started working for Key Airlines, and once again, someone said
*their* 727-51 (they only had one) was the D.B. Cooper plane.  He
once again resurrected his search for the identity of the real one
to prove that this was not it, and much to his amazement, found that
Key's 727-51 was indeed the Cooper plane.  (He had never been on it
elsewhere, so obviously none of those planes had been the real one.)

>From personal experience, nearly any time I've been on a United DC-10
that was a bit odd in some way, an FA or pilot has tried to tell me
it was one of the five ex-Delta planes.  They have *never* been right,
and when I have actually been on one of those five, nobody believed
that it was anything other than an ordinary, original United DC-10.

The moral: unless you check the registration, serial number, or other
reliable source, don't believe you're on that special plane because
someone's probably just trying to pull the wool over your eyes.


>Since at that moment we were somwhere over Manitoba, it occured to me that
>the 767 was the one that had flamed out over Manitoba due to total fuel
>exhaustion ...

This story has come up many times in sci.aeronautics.airliners --
search the archives (http://www.chicago.com/airliners/archives.html)
for "Gimli Glider" if you want the whole story.

BTW, C-GAUN (fleet number 604) is the real Gimli Glider.  Accept no
substitutes!  :-)

--
Karl Swartz	|Home	kls@chicago.com
		|Work	kls@slac.stanford.edu
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Moderator of sci.aeronautics.airliners -- Unix/network work pays the bills