Re: An Accelerometer in Paradise

From:         "fred (f.g.) black" <black@bnr.ca>
Organization: Nortel
Date:         21 Mar 96 02:38:07 
References:   1
Followups:    1
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In article <airliners.1996.340@ohare.chicago.com>,
Ian Judge  <ian@judgei.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>Ronald James Wanttaja (wanttaja@chinook.halcyon.com) wrote:
>
>: For the entire travel period, the maximum G level was:
>:    X = 6.167
>:    Y = 6.889
>:    Z = 10.10
>
>: These sound high, but remember, most of them are short-lived events with
>: not much energy in them.  It should be noted that I carried a china teapot
>: in the same suitcase as the EDR (wrapped in bubble wrap); it arrived
>: unbroken.
>
>These sound particularly high when you consider that the maximum g-loading
>of a B757 is 3g. Approx 3 yrs ago Caledonian severely bent a B757 with a
>heavy landing of 2.76g. The aircraft took 3 weeks to prepare for a ferry
>flight ...

The max loading for the entire plane may be 3g, but that doesn't apply to
something inside the plane, particularly if it can move around.  I think
I read somewhere that the peak deccelleration of a metal box pushed off of
a table and landing on a concrete floor can exceed 100g!

--
Fred G. Black, P. Eng.  E-mail:  black@nortel.ca     Nortel North America
PP-ASEL,G               Phone:   (613)-763-7452 (W)  P.O. Box 3511 StationC
                                 (613)-823-6017 (H)  Ottawa, Ontario
My opinions only                                     Canada K1Y 4H7