Re: Concorde

Date:         23 Nov 96 03:36:25 
From:         don@rata.vuw.ac.nz (Don Stokes)
Organization: Victoria University of Wellington
References:   1 2
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In article <airliners.1996.2503@ohare.chicago.com>,
Charlie Whitaker <charlie1@easynet.co.uk> wrote:
>- During 'supercruise' the plane tends to gradually climb, so that on one
>side of the Atlantic it is at, say, 50,000 feet, but by the time it is
>across the ocean (about 2 hours later) it has climbed to around 60,000
>feet. This is known as 'cruise-climb.'

I understand this is deliberate; as the plane lightens due to fuel burn,
it can cruise higher while maintaining cruising speed; as long as the
plane can stay in trim at the higher altitude, it needs less power to
maintain speed and therefore uses less fuel.

--
Don Stokes, Network Manager, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
don@vuw.ac.nz(work) don@zl2tnm.gen.nz(home) +64 4 495-5052 Fax+64 4 471-5386