Re: longest flight?

From:         Don.Stokes@vuw.ac.nz (Don Stokes)
Organization: Victoria University of Wellington
Date:         12 Oct 96 02:35:59 
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Alan Wong  <Alan.Wong@anu.edu.au> wrote:
>Similarly for other southern hemisphere trans-continental routes such as
>Auckland to Buenos Aires and Johannesburg/Cape Town to Rio/Sao Paulo/Buenos
>Aires. This will have implications for airlines such as Qantas, Air New
>Zealand and South African Airways when purchasing aircraft eg A340 vs 777X.

There's very little traffic AKL/SYD to S. America, certainly not enough
to affect aircraft purchasing decisions; certainly not enough to justify
purchase of a completely new aircraft type (Air NZ is very much a Boeing
shop).  There's also too little traffic to justify direct flights; the
usual approach to serving S. America is by island hopping, which serves
the islands as well.  Typically this is done by meeting Chilean flights
(which have go via Easter Is) at Papeete.

Last time I passed through PPT the Chilean flight was being served by a
707; I believe this has since been replaced by a 767, but you get the
idea as to just how popular this route isn't.

In short, if you've got an ETOPS 767, you can serve S. Pacific to S.
American routes and live with island hopping.  You'd need a 747-400 or
similar range aircraft to do the route non-stop, and there just isn't the
traffic to justify it.

--
Don Stokes, Network Manager, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
don@vuw.ac.nz(work) don@zl2tnm.gen.nz(home) +64 4 495-5052 Fax+64 4 471-5386