Re: End of airliner evolution?

From:         DennisO <dmo@azstarnet.com>
Organization: LinDen Enterprises: Computer Consultant/Teacher in Tucson
Date:         11 Oct 96 19:44:50 
References:   1
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> I would like to hear others views on where advances in aeronautics will
> take us and how far away is the end.
>
> imacduff@aol.com

You indicated that we haven't moved far from the Boeing 707
and we don't seem to be moving the commercial airliner along
much right now.

You are probably right. In the 50's I took a close look at
the reciprocating engine  and would have
bet lots of dough that the very very inefficient recip would
be long gone as we near the 21st century.

I then watched the Chrysler turbine car come and go.

I then watched the Indy 500 virtually ban jet engines
ensuring that no further research would occur.

And of course, the automotive world watched Mazda struggle
for years on the Wankel engine.

However, here we are knocking at the door of year 2000
and we still drive engines where the pistons reverse
directions thousands of times per minute.

Good thing we got jet engines going in circles before we stagnated.

A good indicator of 50 years from now is to ask, what are Lockheed,
Boeing, and others working on right now? I haven't seen any articles
that indicate any attempt to go faster, higher, and safer-airframe wise.

P.S. Don't flame. If you know where to find more info, please pass
it along.

Some futurist believe that the next speed gain for common
travel is underground using evacuated (vacuum) tunnels and
electromagnetic fields providing the acceleration and
deceleration.