Re: B757 "Heavy Jet"?

From:         ABrowne@mtl.marconi.ca (Alan Browne)
Organization: Canadian Marconi Company
Date:         26 Jul 96 10:59:15 
References:   1 2
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In article <airliners.1996.1348@ohare.Chicago.COM>, amb@bronze.lcs.mit.edu
says...
>
>Doug Snow  <dougie@mama.indstate.edu> wrote:
[[snipped]]
>Now, the thing I'm really curious about: aircrew are required to have
>type-specific ratings for "large" aircraft, plus a few others (see FAR
>61.5 and AC61.1).  Will everything between 12,500 lbs. and 41,000 lbs.
>really now be legally flyable by any random ME pilot?  It's an
>interesting if not scary speculation, although I'm actually more
>concerned about the fact that, when flying a light aircraft, the
>separation standards between me and all of the newly "small" aircraft
>just went *poof*...
>

Although ATP licences seem to grant god like privileges... the powers that
really be are the insurance companies.... not many ATP's will be able to fly
an aircraft above 4000 LBS (never mind up to 40,000 LBS) wihtout the
insurance company being satisfied with his ability and qualifications.  It
is my understanding that any revenue flying on a ME requires a specific type
rating (In Canada it is the Pilot Proficieny Check).

As to what's HEAVY and what's NOT heavy...

Instead of using categories such as HEAVY / MEDIUM to decide whether an
aircraft should wait a little longer for departure, why not use a delta
weight to decide... eg if aircraft A is (say) 30%  heavier than B, then B
should take the full 2 minute disipation time before takeoff, or get an
extra minute separation on approach?

Alan.