Re: AA965 proves Airbus bashers deadly wrong

From:         bosc@perige.eis.enac.dgac.fr (Jean-Francois Bosc)
Date:         25 Jan 96 00:55:03 
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In article <airliners.1996.86@ohare.Chicago.COM>, mezei_jf@eisner.decus.org (Jean-Francois Mezei) writes:

> About enveloppe "breaking":
>
> If a manufacturer is going to find out what the envelopes of its aircraft
> are, perhaps it should have 2 numbers: a safe enveloppe and a maximum
> enveloppe.  The whole point of these envelopes is to allow the pilot to push
> the button to the max without having to worry about breaking the plane. This is
> the same as ABS brakes in cars: you push the pedal to the max and you know that
> the computer will apply justy the right amount of braking to get you to stop
> the fastest. Users who are not used to ABS will defeat its purpose by "pumping"
> the brakes and won't get the most efficient braking because they don't use them
> properly. I think that the same applies to any new system.


I like the example. Think I can develop a little more.

ABS gives you the certainty that you will stay in control in (almost) all
situations. The cost is a braking distance increased by at least 5% (and
much more with poor systems) compared to optimal braking, even if you use
ABS properly (the idea is to be able to avoid the obstacle while braking,
not to optimize braking distance).

Still nobody suggests that the driver should keep total control on braking
power, because only a few people (probably only race pilots, and not all
of them) are able to apply optimal braking in an emergency situation ...

JF

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Jean-Francois Bosc (bosc@eis.enac.dgac.fr)
Ecole Nationale de l'Aviation Civile
TOULOUSE, FRANCE
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