Re: History question:

From:         "BMADDISO@bcsc02.gov.bc.ca"@SATURN.GOV.BC.CA
Date:         08 May 95 02:09:07 
References:   1
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Path: bcsc02.gov.bc.ca!BMADDISO
Newsgroups: sci.aeronautics.airliners
Subject: Re: History question:
Message-ID: <17395C7E1S86.BMADDISO@bcsc02.gov.bc.ca>
From: BMADDISO@bcsc02.gov.bc.ca
Date: Fri, 05 May 95 14:12:41 PDT
References: <airliners.1995.560@ohare.Chicago.COM>
Organization: BC Systems Corporation
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In article <airliners.1995.560@ohare.Chicago.COM>
mholt@freenet.vcu.edu writes:

>I have been looking at a photo of the L-649 Constellation.  A
>most beautiful aircraft....
>
>Why was thte fuselage curved like that?  I can't see any
>advantage in it: it would have been expensive (copmpared to the
>cylinder fuselages of contemporary airlines).

It may be apochryphal, but the story usually goes something like this:

- the large propellers necessitated a long (for the time) landing gear
- the Connie was ordered to TWA design and had to fit vertically in the
  hangars at Kansas City
- long gear and a straight fuselage would have meant the tail was too
  high (some versions of the story also use this point to account for
  the triple fin configuration)

so the fuselage was 'bent' at both ends, which was indeed fortunate for
us lovers of beautiful airplanes.

   Brian Maddison (bmaddiso@bcsc02.gov.bc.ca)