Re: High tech jets = High risk jets?

From:         alfonso@melbpc.org.au (Vince Alfonso)
Organization: Melbourne PC User Group Inc, Australia
Date:         19 Dec 95 02:03:08 
References:   1
Followups:    1
Next article
View raw article
  or MIME structure


>Hans Krakauer, senior vice-president of aviation for the International
>Airline Passengers Association said: "It's not just that these aircraft
>are technologically highly developed, but many are being flown by pilots
>who are technologically highly underdeveloped."

The Above comment is all too correct.
Airlines, particuraly, Asian airlines are experiencing such rapid
growth that finding crews is difficult.  To make the problem even
worse many Airlines want 'local' crews (read 'paid less') rather than
expatriates.
Many Asian airlines have cadet training schemes putting pilots, barely
capable of flying IFR in command, into the Airline environment.

The most obvious exceptions to this local rule are SIA, Cathay and
DragonAir.  All use expatriate crews extensivley and as such all enjoy
a high saftey and service standard combined with stong Company
loyalty by the crews.

On that point I beleive that Cathay is suffering somewhat on the
loyalty front with many recent crews on newer lower pay scales opting
out for other better paid positions.

It all leads down the same old 'catch 22' trail.  Everyone wants
experienced crews but how do you get them?  The point is though that
only the safer airlines will see reasonable profits in the long term.
A recent publication of a saftey journal cited that unless present
accident rates are curbed, (presently .04 accidents per 100,000 hrs),
then that when combined with the predicted increase in air travel
would result in a major hull loss every 2 weeks by 2010.

WOULD YOU FLY, GIVEN A CHOICE, ON AN AIRLINE WITH A
POOR SAFTEY RECORD?

Vince