Re: Long term storage

From:         stevep@shell.portal.com (Steven H Philipson)
Organization: Mountain View Flight Service
Date:         13 Feb 95 01:44:21 
References:   1
Followups:    1
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In article <airliners.1995.83@ohare.Chicago.COM>,
Peter Lisner <plisner@mti.mti.sgi.com> wrote:
[re:  storage of aircraft in the Mojave desert.]

>[...] I can
>understand why this is done for older aircraft,
>but what didn't make sense was the fact that some
>current generation airliners were also stored in
>this way. The most striking example was a British
>Airways B767. Given that this aircraft is still in
>production, I don't understand why it was stored
>like this. One would think that it could be sold
>or leased instead of letting it sit idle.

   Leasing an airplane takes a fair amount of preparation.
It frequently has to be modified to match the fleet of the
lessee, and they tend to like to have leased aircraft 
painted in their own livery.  Also, leases tend to be for
fairly long terms.  If the owner only wants to have the airplane
in storage for a short period, say 6 months plus or minus
a few, then it doesn't make sense to put those new airplanes
up for lease.

   It may seem crazy to have a 100 million dollar airplane 
just sitting there (especially when the financing is running
$20,000 per day), but it can be the cheapest alternative for
the airline.  This is a big-bucks business.  What seems like
huge amounts for individuals is all just part of the game
they're in.

						Steve
					(the certified flying fanatic)
					    stevep@shell.portal.com