Re: Question: Cabin environment on long haul flights

From:         Steve Lacker <slacker@arlut.utexas.edu>
Organization: applied research laboratories
Date:         13 Oct 95 12:38:21 
References:   1
Followups:    1
Next article
View raw article
  or MIME structure

leishman@hellcat.eng.umd.edu. (leishman) wrote:
><snip>
>I've been hearing that on eastbound transatlantic
>overnight flights some airlines deliberately elevate cabin temparatures
>to make passengers sleep (parhaps this reduces cabin staff workload?),
>and also reduce oxygen flow in the cabin to save money. Is this really
>a common practice among airlines? Any comments sure would be
>appreciated.


Well, its not a question of *oxygen* since under normal conditions airliners
don't use pure oxygen- they use outside air which is compressed by the engines,
then cooled by heat exchangers to pressurize the cabin (see the related thread
on cabin pressurization and airflow). Oxygen (as in bottled O2) is only fed to
the drop-down masks in an emergency, I believe.
--
Steve Lacker	/	Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas
512-835-3286	/	PO Box 8029, Austin TX 78713-8029
slacker@arlut.utexas.edu