Re: exit door latch

From:         bradg@io.org (Brad Gillies)
Organization: Leading Edge Aviation Services
Date:         22 Sep 95 00:18:33 
References:   1 2 3 4 5
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In article <airliners.1995.1495@ohare.Chicago.COM>,
   "Nicolas E. Murat" <vis@elaine14.Stanford.EDU> wrote:
>On 12 Sep 1995, Andrew Goldfinger wrote:
>
>> In article <airliners.1995.1439@ohare.Chicago.COM> Nicolas Ercan Murat,
>> vis@amy29.Stanford.EDU writes:
>> >This was proven when an evacuation slide on an PIA A310 decided to
>> >inflate during flight ...
>>
>> >The end of the story was that an on-board mechanic ran back and gave
>> >a big stab with his screwdriver and punctured the slide.
>>
>> What gas is used to inflate the slides?  If it is CO2, was it safe to
>> puncture the slide and release the gas into the cabin?  (This question
>> arose in my mind since I am now reading "Lost Moon" by Lovell about Apollo
>> 13, and they had a problem with a life vest inflating.  They were very
>> careful to vent the CO2 into space rather than release it into the cabin).
>
>The slide inflation is activated by a small gas bottle. I am unfortunately
>not certain of what the gas is.
>

The gas is NITROGEN. Harmless you breathe about 80% Nitrogen anyway.
Besides the cabin air is "Turned over" quite rapidly. So There would
Be no real Problem.

>However, the gas dispensed by the bottle is small in comparison to the
>amount of air required in the slide.  The main inflation is done through
>"aspirators" which suck in air when the slide is deployed, so the gas bottles
>are in effect only there to kick in the system and are too small to fill
>the whole slide anyway.
>

You know.....I did not know that. Thats very interesting.

>In any case, I do not think that CO2 dispension into the cabin does has
>the same consequences as in a space craft... Also, as an aside, I would like
>to note how complex the slide/rafts on commercial aircraft are complex.  They
>are one of the systems (ATA 25-62) with the most complications during
>maintenance and in design itself.
>

I would guess that in a space craft the air is finite in an airplane theres
always more.  I have seen accidental deployments several times The systems
are very tempermental.


--
Brad Gillies    Bradg@io.org
http://www.io.org/~bradg/
Leading Edge Aviation Services
Aviation Maintenance, The Backbone of Aviation.