Re: Aircraft Maneuvers

From:         Don Stokes <Don.Stokes@vuw.ac.nz>
Organization: Victoria University of Wellington
Date:         06 Sep 95 01:04:08 
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In article <airliners.1995.1365@ohare.chicago.com> you write:
>>On a related note, sometime ago (years) I read that the then
>>chief pilot for TWA put a 707 through a roll during a test
>>flight.  Is/was a 707 capable of this?
>
>I never heard of TWA doing it, but Tex Johnston, a Boeing test pilot,
>rolled the prototype 707 (the 367-80) twice for the crowds at Seattle's
>hydroplane races.  The story has been discussed many times in this
>group -- see the archives for more, or most any book on Boeing history.
>(Some Air Force pilots also rolled a KC-135, the 707's military sister.)

A good TV documentary on aircraft matters (whos name escapes me right now)
had a Concorde pilot describe Concorde being barrel-rolled; a pilot friend
of mine once related an anecdote about pilots in NZ doing aerobatics in
737s on positioning flights.

But seriously, a barrel roll isn't particularly stressful.  What you don't
see from the ground is that the properly executed roll maintains positive
gee; if it weren't for the horizon doing a 360 you couldn't tell from on
board that it's happening -- I've seen footage of tea being poured in the
cockpit of an aircraft during a roll, without spilling a drop.  More to
the point, the fuel pumps and anything else that might be sensitive to
inverted flight don't know that the plane is upside down, and therefore
behave just fine through a roll.

--
Don Stokes, Network Manager, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
don@vuw.ac.nz(work) don@zl2tnm.gen.nz(home) +64 4 495-5052 Fax+64 4 471-5386