Re: Future of 757, 767

From:         drinkard@bcstec.ca.boeing.com (Terrell D. Drinkard)
Organization: The Boeing Company
Date:         28 Jul 95 02:53:21 
References:   1 2 3 4
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In article <airliners.1995.1065@ohare.Chicago.COM>,
Tim Takahashi <tim@me.rochester.edu> wrote:
>In article <airliners.1995.1060@ohare.Chicago.COM>,
>Karl Swartz <kls@ohare.Chicago.COM> wrote:
>>>As I recall it, Boeing wanted a smaller seat count 757 in its original
>>>proposals.
>
>>John Nance, in The Sport Game, claims this was a major error by Boeing
>>since the 727-200 had a market to itself in the 150-seat class, and
>>the smaller 757 would have been the logical replacement.  The 757 as

It was _The Sporty Game_, and it was written by John Newhouse.

>The "smaller" 757 would be the never produced 757-100, but then again
>the 737-400 must have been fairly far along in design at this point.
>The last 737-400 I was on had a mixed layout for 140.

Nope.  The 757 was under development in the late 1970s, and the 737-400
program didn't launch until around 1984 or 1985.  Your memory of the
size is correct.

>I take it that the per-seat operating costs of the 737-400 are
>sufficiently below a 757-100 to make the construction of the latter
>unprofitable. Alaska Airlines claims the 737-400 is the most
>efficient airliner per passenger mile, any truth?

The 737-400s Direct Operating Costs per seat are very low.  But only
for the single-aisle, short-haul markets.  The 757 bridges the gap
between the single-aisle airplanes and the twin aisle airplanes.
That is, the 757's design is for a different market segment, and it
is not as suitable for the short-haul, austere airport environment
as the 737.  Really, how much demand can their be for a 5,000 nmi
185 seat airplane?  After all, the A321 has about that capacity,
though nothing like that kind of range, and it hasn't exactly been
selling like hotcakes.  :-)

The lowest cost per seat mile is generated by the 747-400, if we
limit the discussion to current production aircraft.  The 777-300X
will hold that title when it enters production at the end of the
decade.  An Airbus marketing person's mileage may vary.  :-)

--
Terry
drinkard@bcstec.ca.boeing.com
"Anyone who thinks they can hold the company responsible for what I say has
more lawyers than sense."