Re: Plane Nose Dives From Break

From:         Joseph_Hall@sat.mot.com (Joseph Hall)
Organization: Motorola Inc., Satellite Communications
Date:         09 Jul 94 16:58:52 
References:   1
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Seems it was kls@ohare.Chicago.COM (Karl Swartz) who said:
>	About an hour and 20 minutes into the trip, a flight attendant
>tried to place a box holding refreshments on the foot rest of the
>jump seat behind the first officer, Pollock said.
>	The seat was too far back for the box to fit and the reserve
>first officer reached for the latch to move the seat forward.
>	The seat advanced sharply, pushing the first officer into the
>control column. That automatically disengaged the automatic pilot
>and ``they went into a nose-down dive,'' Pollock said.

A friend of mine recounts a story about changing seat positions
while in flight.  He was nearing the end of his light plane
instruction on a solo flight.  He is pretty short (5'3" or thereabouts)
and adjusted his seat position before takeoff.  Unfortunately the
latch wasn't completely engaged and the seat slid back to the stops
after rotation, leaving him with a view of nothing but blue sky,
out of reach of the rudder pedals and barely able to hold the
yoke.  He maintained control but was so unnerved that he never 
completed his instruction.

-- 
Joseph Nathan Hall | Joseph's Law of Interface Design: Never give your users
Software Architect | a choice between the easy way and the right way.
Gorca Systems Inc. |                 joseph@joebloe.maple-shade.nj.us (home)
(on assignment)    | (602) 732-2549 (work)  Joseph_Hall-SC052C@email.mot.com