Re: causes of go 'rounds?

From:         rteasdal@galaxy.csc.calpoly.edu (Russell Graham Teasdale)
Organization: Computer Science Department, Cal Poly SLO
Date:         16 May 94 01:53:31 
References:   1 2 3
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In article <airliners.1994.1218@ohare.chicago.com>,
R.Ludorf <ez939042@xdm024.sme.cranfield.ac.uk> wrote:
>
	[with regard to animals on the runway]

>Not necessarily a reason for a 'go-around'. Think I remember an accident in 
>India, where an Airbus crashed into some sacred cattle/live-stock whatsoever 
>on the runway while landing...
>
>rainer
>


	There was a memorable incident in Pakistan a few years back, in
which a just-delivered F-16 was taking off when a wild pig, spooked by
the jet noise, ran onto the runway. The A/C collided with the pig just
a second or so before the pilot would have rotated...

	Result: one dead pig. One crashed, burned-out F-16. The pilot,
however, survived, thanks to the wonders of his zero-zero ejection seat.
I do not know whether his ground crew painted a pig silhouette onto his
next fighter's canopy rail, however...

	And while on _that_ topic, I spoke once with a Marine pilot who
said that when flying commercial, he tried to avoid being scheduled onto
Scarebusses if he could possibly help it. He was apparently not fond of the
FBW system employed by Airbus.

	Sensing a contradiction between this, and the fact that he was
attached to a squadron flying F/A-18 Hornets, I pressed him for an answer
as to why one FBW plane was necessarily worse than another.

	His answer? ("When I'm driving my Hornet, I'm sitting in a nice
ejection seat. If the plane decides to do something really weird, I can
always part company with it on amicable terms.") Hmmmm. I had to confess
that I'd never thought of it in quite those terms.



-- 
||||||||   Russ Teasdale -- rteasdal@galaxy.CalPoly.EDU  --  (Rusty)  |||||||||
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