Re: Exhaust fumes in aircraft cabin?

From:         Joseph_Hall@sat.mot.com (Joseph Hall)
Organization: Motorola Inc., Satellite Communications
Date:         14 May 94 00:08:41 
References:   1 2
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Seems it was tristar500@aol.com (TriStar500) who said:
>In article <airliners.1994.1187@ohare.Chicago.COM>, rdd@netcom.com (Robert
>Dorsett) writes:
>
>>Right; they were coming from the planes in front of you.
>
>The fumes could also be from two other sources.
>
>1. A failure of an engine bearing-seal allowing oil to enter the compressor
>section of the engine.
>
>2. An overheat of one of the air conditioning packs. Not likely on an MD-80,
>but pretty common on a 727. This is generally accompanied by oily smoke.

Deicing mixture also has a "nice" odor, kind of like kerosine mixed
with perfume.  I forget what the circumstances with the original poster
were, but sometimes sitting on the ground or the runway you can get
a nice cabin full of fumes if the air intakes were left on during
deicing.

-- 
Joseph Nathan Hall | Joseph's Law of Interface Design: Never give your users
Software Architect | a choice between the easy way and the right way.
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