Re: 757 airfoil specs

From:         molsen@iti.org (Michael E. Olsen)
Organization: NASA Ames Research Center
Date:         22 Apr 94 20:31:05 
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jacob@plasma2.ssl.berkeley.edu (Fungi from Berkeley) writes:
: I need some info on Beoing 757 wing sections, mainly the type(s)
: of airfoil sections used in the wing. Also AR, span, and winglet
: specs (if any) would be helpful. 
:
: jacob@sunspot.ssl.berkeley.edu 
: 
If you're handing these out, I'd be interested myself.  I'm in an
experimental fluids branch, and we're considering designing an 
code validation experiment which would be applicable to transport
type aircraft.  I would also be very interested in talking with any
actual transport wing designers.  Our object would be to produce a
model which will give all the flow field phenomenon experienced by
a "real live transport", but in a geometry easily and reliably(sp?)
gridded.  My initial look at the subject gives me the impression
that there is an optimal AR and taper ratio with some variation in
the sweep angles and chord vs. y distribution.  My experimental
inclination is to go with "no twist" wings (so that you have a
built in 2nd experiment to check the tunnel/model asymmetries), but
I am led to believe that this would be a non-starter for any "real
wing designer".  

Any input would be appreciated.  BTW, with the current funding
situation, and our long term "well you did it with x people, and
got the job done, so you should be able to do it with x-1"
situation, I wouldn't hold your breath on getting the data back
quickly (x is now in the range [0,2]).  However, if you'd like to 
see some reliable code validation data, this would be a good chance to
give your input on the "ground floor".  If we'll still be doing
experiments, I wouldn't be surprised if the experiment started in 3yrs,
and the data was available 2yrs after that.  In order to actually have
a chance to get this done in that type of timeframe, we're going to
have to begin to 'cut metal' in December, so now is the time.

--
Mike Olsen
molsen@kyzyl.arc.nasa.gov
(415)604-6200