Airliner MPG

From:         barr@ash.mmm.ucar.EDU (Keith Barr)
Date:         13 Oct 93 11:50:51 PDT
References:   1
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I have a handy-dandy little fact card on aviation statistics from the
Aircraft Owner's and Pilot's Association.  It is dated 1992, and contains
1990 data.  

The fine print says: "primary sources of data include the Federal Aviation
Administration, the National Transportation Safety Board, the General
Aviation Manufacturers Association, and others.  1990 is the latest year
complete information is available," so use at your own risk.

Here are the Activity Estimates (all numbers in Millions)

                General      Commercial
Category        Aviation     Aviation      Total
--------------  -----------  ------------  ----------
Hours Flown         34.8          16.9          51.7
Miles Flown      4,196.5       5,041.0*      9,237.5
Departures          52.9          10.5**        63.4
Passengers         132.3***      465.6****     597.9
Fuel Consumed    1,241.0      16,254.0#     17,495.0

   *  Includes scheduled and unscheduled 121 & 135 ops.
  **  Includes sched. & unsched 121, and scheduled 135 ops.
 ***  Based upon 2.5 passengers per general aviation departure
****  Includes scheduled Part 121 only
   #  Preliminary

So, If we believe the numbers, we could create the following table:
(the RX-7 numbers are derived experimentaly from my car :^)

                General      Commercial                 Mazda
Category        Aviation     Aviation      Total        RX-7 
--------------  -----------  ------------  ----------   -----
Pasx./Dep.        2.5          44.3           4.98        2
Mi./Gal.          3.4           0.31          0.53       25
Pasx. Mi./Gal.    8.5          13.73          4.98       50

Since the commercial aviation number of passengers is only based upon
Part 121 operations, and the number of departures is for both 121 and
135, the 44.3 enplanements per flight is obviously low, therfore the
overall average pasx-miles/gallon is low.  My gueess would be that the
average Part 121 enplanement number would be around 150, so that would
give a 45 pasx-mi/gal. number, which is consistent with other numbers I
have seen posted.

Apparently the car is somewhat more efficient, but I can't get the RX-7
to go 600 mph (even downhill).

I think the average bus holds about 50 people, and gets 8 mpg, resulting
in a whopping 400 pasx-mi/gal, by the way!
 _____________________________           _____
| Keith Barr                  \           \   \__      _____                  
| barr@ncar.ucar.edu           \___________\   \/_______\___\_____________    
| COMM/AS&MEL/IA/A&IGI         /           { /_/ .......................  `-.
|_____________________________/             `-----------,----,--------------'
                                                      _/____/O