Re: Mouse grounds 767

From:         hoyme@src.honeywell.com (Ken Hoyme)
Organization: Honeywell Systems & Research Center, Mpls. MN, USA.
Date:         21 May 93 03:43:47 PDT
References:   1 2 3
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In article <airliners.1993.417@ohareChicago.COM> rdd@cactus.org (Robert Dorsett) writes:
> Approved: kls@ohareChicago.COM

> In article <airliners.1993.414@ohareChicago.COM> jacobs@charly.taclog.af.mil writes:
>>The US Department of Agriculture (and probably its British equivalent)
>>frown on stowaway mice arriving aboard airliners from foreign
>>lands. As I recall the fines are pretty stiff and there is also
>>the possibility that the aircraft could be impounded...

> USDA got pretty aggressive about all this around ten years ago; I have
> clear memories of coming in from overseas and, fifteen minutes prior
> to landing, the cabin crew walking through the cabin *gassing* us, emptying
> cans of insecticide into the air.  No, they didn't drop the oxygen 
> masks. :-)

We got the 'gas treatment' last Fall as we were on approach to Sydney,
Australia.  No gas on the return flight, though.  Of course, Australia
has some pretty graphic experiences with non-native plants and animals
overtaking ones native to OZ.  While I wasn't too concerned about our
breif exposure, I wondered about the crew, who might get a shot of
insecticide several times per month.  I suppose it would be bad for the
image if the flight attendants wore gas masks while spraying the
passangers.   :-)

Ken